7 Steps to Stronger Student Collaboration Activities

7 Steps to Stronger Student Collaboration Activities

If you are trying to encourage collaboration in your classroom and are having trouble, read on.  You will see 7 steps that will help you build stronger student collaborators in collaboration activities.

What’s All the Hubbub?

Why is collaboration such a big deal all of a sudden?  Everybody wants to collaborate: songwriters, businesses, school districts, teachers, and now students.  What is it, and what, if anything, is its importance?

Well, as it turns out, collaboration boosts creativity and thinking.  Teamwork works for big jobs and also for small jobs.

According to P21.org,

“The ability to work in teams is one of the most sought-after skills among new hires, yet research suggests that students may not be graduating with the level of skills needed to succeed on the job.”

That’s reason enough for me to start incorporating collaboration into my classes to allow my students the opportunity to practice and attain those collaboration skills.

New Information

For two years, I encouraged collaboration in all of the classes with which I worked.  After awhile, I started to wonder whether all the work to set up collaboration was really that important.  Then I was present for a presentation by Anthony Kim of Ed Elements.  In that presentation, Kim shared some data with us from John Hattie’s Visible Learning.  What caught my attention and subsequent dedication to collaboration is the graphic below.  

John Hattie's Visible Learning Growth Chart

Taken with permission from Anthony Kim’s presentation. @anthonx

In it, Hattie shows that 0.40 is the effect size for one year’s growth.  The highest growth effect comes as a result of … you guessed it, peer collaboration and discussion coming in at a whopping 0.82!

That means that, according to Hattie, peer collaboration and discussion result in students learning more than twice what they would learn in a traditional classroom with a traditional teacher.  Even more than differentiation and immediate feedback.  

That’s worth restating.  Peer collaboration and discussion result in students learning twice what they would learn in a normal year’s growth.

Whoa!  That’s amazing!   With growth like that, we should all be collaborating and discussing all day long, right?

Were We Successful?

Well, my teachers and I worked on collaboration in our classrooms.  We learned about, planned out, tried out, and reflected on blended learning station rotation that required a collaboration station.  The results were very telling.

At our end-or-the-year meeting we reported out our findings.  Of our group, 95% said that the collaboration station was the least successful.  Upon reflection, here’s what we surmised: students don’t need just the opportunity to collaborate; they need to be taught how to collaborate well.

 How Can We Improve Collaboration?7 Steps to Building Better Student Collaborators

All summer I thought about why we failed and how we could succeed.  I knew there had to be a way to teach students how to collaborate well, and I processed and researched and finally put together this infographic called “7 Steps to Building Student Collaborators” (see right) for teachers to follow as a scaffold for building strong collaborators.  As everything else in education, this is a work in progress, so please try it out and send me some feedback to improve it for all who might happen upon it and try it out. Here is a detailed description to help you get started.  As it is a progression, feel free to jump in wherever makes the most sense for your students.

Step 1: Begin with open-ended discussion questions for the students to process their thoughts.  Google Classroom is a great tool for this because the answers to Classroom discussion questions are hidden until after a student submits his/her answer.  No copying, folks.  What you see is what you get.  Set the settings to allow students to respond.  (This allows them to see other’s answers).  However, you must go into the Student section and change the rights to “Only teachers can post or comment.” (see graphic) You want this because in step 2 you have to teach your students how to write an appropriate response to a post.

Step 2: Teach students what makes an appropriate, well-written response to a post.  To do this, share How-To videos 1 and 2 below and Accountable Talk/Moves charts like the one below that demonstrate well-written responses, and practice, practice, practice.  Maybe your students could be empowered to create their own video, blog, vlog, or infographic for others to use.

  

Step 3: Give students the opportunity to practice using accountable talk (found here and here), and practice responding as a whole group to one another’s posts in Google Classroom.  As a modeling exercise, the teacher will type the responses as the students formulate them together.  You can start out whole group and move toward small groups formulating responses as one entity.  There are plenty of apps to assist you.  Socrative allows students to post their answers and then vote on the best one.  Google Classroom allows teachers to post a discussion question for group responses with only one person per group submitting a response.  A shared Google Doc with a table can be used to share out the final group responses.  A shared Google Drawing can be used with post-it note style text boxes for each group to claim and fill.  Please know that once is not enough.  Students need the opportunity to practice, practice, practice.  Once you are confident that students know how to write group responses, change the Google Classroom settings to “Students can post and comment.”  This will open up discussion questions for peer response.  Once you feel confident that students understand the phraseology in writing, you need to transition to verbal responses.

Step 4: Move to an on-the-spot, think-fast, response system that requires accountable talk or sentence starters.  Socratic seminars are just the activity for this.  If you are not familiar with Socratic seminars, they are basically student-led discussions with the requirement that everyone has to contribute something to the discussion.  The teacher is responsible for formulating questions that are open-ended and draw out student interpretations that should then be supported with text or some other data.  Great Book, Junior Great Book Shared Inquiry discussions, and Fishbowl discussions are similar to a Socratic seminar.  It doesn’t matter what system you use as long as students have to piggyback on one another’s responses.  This is where the accountable talk comes in. It gives students the phraseology to have civil agreement and disagreement.  It also encourages deeper inquiry instead of superficial analysis of a topic.

Step 5: Now that students are becoming comfortable with more academic phrases and sentence starters as a whole group with teacher monitoring, it is time to set them into small groups to monitor themselves.  Create simultaneous small groups each with the same task: run your own Socratic seminar or Great Books discussion for shared inquiry.  Formulate starter questions as a whole group or as small groups, and then share out before beginning the activity.  Formulating questions is a skill that our students could practice more.  Scaffold here as needed.

After the activity, debrief and give students time to reflect upon what went well and what could be improved.  Practice these small group synchronous discussions a few more times until you and they feel confident that they could monitor themselves completely during a station rotation class period.  It’s now time to move toward asynchronous collaboration.

Step 6: Today is the big day!  Your students should be better prepared to rotate into a collaborative station without needing your help.  This is a huge accomplishment and should be celebrated by you and your students!  Your job is to create 3 or more stations: Independent, Collaborative, Teacher Directed.  If you are not familiar with Blended Learning Station Rotation, check out Blended Learning Universe through the Christensen Institute.

Step 7: Finally, take time to allow students to reflect on the experience.  Debrief with them to get their feedback, so together you can build a better station rotation each time.

Reflection Tools: Journal, blogs, Google Classroom, Google Forms, Think-Pair-Share, ClassKick, Nearpod, Seesaw, Vocaroo, audio recorder, video recorder, Screencastify, etc.

The Power of Feedback

If you are ready to try collaboration with your students, please try out this scaffold and send me some feedback.  I’d love to hear about your successes as well as your recommendations for how, together, we can make this process better.  It’s all about the collaboration, right?

Here is the infographic in case you’d like to print it out.

Virtual Coaching Helps Build Relationships

Virtual Coaching Helps Build Relationships

There is only so much time in a day for teachers and instructional coaches, and with emails, meetings, and traveling, the time to actually meet with teachers is whittled down. So what are some tricks to coaching teachers long-distance? Have you thought about virtual coaching to need your teachers consistently and in a timely fashion? Using the tech tools to coach teachers virtually makes perfect sense.

Google Hangouts Enable Virtual Coaching

Use Google Hangouts to enable virtual coachingThe most obvious tool is Google Hangout to meet with teachers without having to travel to see them. Scheduling your time and sticking to it is going to be the most important factor. If the person isn’t at her desk to pick up, the meeting will never happen. For this, I recommend getting the teacher’s number to text her to make sure she is ready for the hangout.

You have to find a quiet place to hold the hangout. If you have an office, you’re all set.  However, if you travel among multiple schools, Starbucks and Barnes & Noble probably wouldn’t work.  Instead, try to schedule an empty conference room in the office or media center.  The first few Hangouts are a little awkward; neither one of you wants to see your own face or hear your own voice.  But don’t let that stop you. After a while, you will both get used to it and will figure out what works best for you.

Google Classroom

A second simple way to coach teachers virtually is to register in their Google Classrooms as a student and stalk them (not in a weird way). Do NOT turn off your notifications. Yes, your inbox will fill quickly as teachers use Classroom more and more; however, you have a birds-eye view of all of the activities teachers are doing via Classroom.

As you see the titles pop up in your inbox, click on the ones that catch your attention.  Dig in, and read the directions. What better way is there to evaluate an activity. You can quickly see where it falls on the SAMR scale, whether it encourages the 4 Cs, whether it incorporates authentic learning, blogging, encourages innovation, etc.

I use Classroom to communicate directly with the teachers by posting a private comment right in the assignment window. It’s fast and direct.  If it is something that might help another teacher, I ask permission to share the idea.  Most teachers are so thrilled and flattered that something they created is good enough to share; I have yet to be denied the request.

Here is an example of a reflection exercise posted by one of my teachers in her English 3 classroom.  As you can see, I posted a comment reflecting how impressed I was and asking for permission to share it.  She communicated right in the same window.  You can see from her response that she was flattered by the compliment and that she gave me permission to share it out.

Google Classroom Assignment

Building Relationships Through Virtual Coaching

Teachers who have support and collaboration are much more creative and content in the classroom.As a coach, building relationships is foundational, so be careful only to post positive remarks. Can you imagine how uplifting it would be to get an unsolicited, positive comment about one of your activities in your inbox? You can also use your positive comments as a reason to meet. What teacher does not want to spend a little time with someone with good things to say who builds them up.

At the same time, can you imagine how blindsided you would feel if a coach left a negative comment in your Classroom?  If someone did that to me, I would remove her immediately from my Classroom roster.  If you see something that concerns you, save it for your in-person discussions.

As things get more and more busy with your schedule and theirs, be creative in ways to reach your teachers. Coaching teachers virtually some of the time is a win-win situation.

The Evolution of an Authentic Activity

The Evolution of an Authentic Activity

Being a teacher can be stressful and time-consuming!  When I was in the classroom teaching 4th-graders through 12th-graders, I wanted to make every lesson important and effective. Doing something new was important to me because I bored easily, and my students did, too.  I was not the type of teacher who could use the same lesson year after year or even period to period.  

Analysis and reflection are important parts of being an effective teacher.  Sometimes our lessons are a huge success; other times, our lessons fall short or are complete failures in our eyes. As I completed lessons, I would reflect on what worked and what could be improved, and I applied what I learned as soon as possible.

Why do teachers put so much pressure on themselves to have the perfect lesson on the first go round?  The following shows the growth of an activity that was good in its first iteration and grew and improved with each iteration into an amazing, powerful, authentic activity.  If you want to grow with the lesson, read on.  If you are really only interested in the final project, jump to the third take.  Either way, be confident that your lessons can grow and improve with each iteration.  As you read along, pay close attention to how real-world involvement and application grow with each iteration.

Authentic Activity: Take 1 

Setting the Scene

The teacher is Ms. Heyward.  The class is English 4: British Literature, and students are mostly seniors with a few juniors sprinkled in. Paradise Lost by John Milton is the literary work of study.  Students will participate in a mock trial to put the characters of Paradise Lost on trial. Students choose which group they want to belong to: 1) characters/actors in the live trial, 2) defense team, 3) prosecution team, and 4) news media.  Each group is responsible for knowing his/her role whether it be developing a character from the story or becoming a lawyer or media blogger.  

The judge listens as the prosecution questions the witness, God.

The judge listens as the prosecution questions the witness, God.

This authentic activity includes the trial of Eve for the fall of man.

Eve is sworn in before being questioned regarding her involvement in the fall of man.

Increasing Collaboration

The concept of a legal team was daunting because only one or two lead lawyers were needed.  To include all members, each team developed a research team responsible for digging into the text and researching things on the spot.  The presence of iPads made using a back channel as a collaboration tool possible; the back channel used was Today’s Meet.  The research teams used it to feed questions and information from the story to their team’s lead lawyers to support the questioning and cross-examination of witnesses.  Everything occurred in real time, on the spot.  You either were prepared or you were not.  There were no re-dos.

This authentic activity revolves around the trial of Satan and his involvement in the fall of man.

Satan is cross-examined by an attorney.

This authentic activity involves defense and prosecuting attorneys in a mock trial.

An attorney for the defense returns to his seat after questioning a witness.

To include more students in the process, there were three media teams tasked with reporting and blogging in the style of three major news outlets: NPR, CNN, and Fox.  Understanding political bias came into play with a review of powerful propaganda words.  A Google Original site was created for each class (see them here: period 1 and period 3) documenting the project.  

Student Engagement

In preparing for the mock trial, students knew they had a responsibility to their team.  The actors had to know their storyline, the legal teams had to know the characters’ stories inside and out, and the media teams had to cover the events in the room while writing in the style of their specific news outlet.  There was not a student in the class whose job did not matter.  Engagement was high, and students left the room talking about the experience.  The use of an authentic activity raised the level of engagement and understanding.

Authentic Activity: Take 2 

Activity Edits

A real judge presides over the authentic mock trial.

A real judge presides over the authentic mock trial.

Fast forward 2 more semesters.  Ms. Heyward saw an opportunity for growth and improvement. In an attempt to make the activity more authentic, she brought in real lawyers to train the students in actual trial proceedings and booked a journalist who recently covered a high-profile trial as a guest speaker to share her insights with the class.  Ms. Heyward also booked a real judge to oversee the trial and had 12 adult jurors from the community serve, deliberate, and assign a verdict.

There was much excitement as the trial date approached.  Students worked on their teams to prepare.  Witness statements were taken, pre-trial hearings were held to determine what will and will not be admissible in court.  Arguments were developed.  Media teams created their own mock news sites and started blogging.

The Big Day

For this authentic mock trial, a 12-person community jury is sworn in.

For this authentic mock trial, a 12-person community jury is sworn in.

The prosecution worked collaboratively to prove guilt.

The prosecution worked collaboratively to prove guilt.

Each attorney is trained in how to properly address a judge in court.

Each attorney is trained in how to properly address a judge in court.

This authentic activity has a bailiff to swear in each witness.

This authentic activity has a bailiff to swear in each witness.

Finally, the big day arrived.  The Media Center was reserved, increasing the feeling of authenticity.  A table at the front was reserved for the bailiff, judge, and witness box.  The jury sat to the right of the judge with the Defense and Prosecution teams sitting opposite the judge and the news outlet teams behind them.  It was very exciting.

Witnesses were sworn in, attorneys stood to address the judge and question witnesses, jury members sat stone-like listening to the proceedings as Eve, Satan, God, the Son of God, and even Sin were called to the stand, sworn in, questioned, and cross-examined. Finally, it was time for the jury to deliberate.

Jury Deliberation

The 12-person jury deliberated in a private room to decide the fates of Satan and Eve.

The 12-person jury deliberated in a private room to decide the fates of Satan and Eve.

As one of the jurors, I can tell you we had a tough time agreeing upon a verdict. Assumptions were made and called out, outside information was brought up and disregarded.  We had to focus only on what was said in the courtroom.  Information we wanted had not been sought by attorneys, so we did not have the information we needed to find both defendants guilty.  Upon returning to the courtroom, the jurors stated the verdict, and the judge took one guilty defendant into custody.  Before wrapping up, the jurors were asked to share their experiences deliberating over the fates of two people.  It was important that  the students see and hear the points that jurors disagreed over, questioned, and finally voted on.

Reflection

In debriefing after the activity, Ms. Heyward and I found the following strengths:

  1. Each student fully took ownership in his/her role.
  2. Students showed mastery of the themes of Paradise Lost.
  3. Students gleaned information about our justice system and the roles different people play within that system.
  4. Students collaborated well on teams working toward a common goal.
  5. Some students had increased creativity in developing the backstories for their characters
  6. Some defense and prosecution members increased their creativity as they built arguments to defend or prosecute characters.
  7. Students thought critically about the parameters of our justice system and tried to manipulate it in their favor whenever possible.

We also found the following weakness:

  1. Students were not able to think quickly on the spot.  Per the jury, the legal teams’ follow-up questions were weak or non-existent.
  2. Some of the characters did not develop their backstories on the stand leaving gaps in understanding for the jury

Upon reflecting, strengths and weaknesses were identified.  In general, the students clearly understood the text and its themes; however, their questioning skills were weak.  We surmised that perhaps the final project was too much all at once.  Perhaps the students needed more scaffolding along the way to prepare for the culminating project. Our new challenge: to find ways to incorporate similar types of activities throughout the entire curriculum.

Authentic Activity: Take 3 

Upon returning from winter break, Ms. Heyward was excited to share with me that she had revamped her entire curriculum to address the issues making “Trial” the theme of her course using British Literature as the content covered.  Each unit provided a guest speaker including lawyers from a local college and court reporters from the local CBS news station.

New Curriculum

  1. Unit 1: Composing an Opening Argument
    • Content: Pursuit of Happiness
    • Students will present themselves to the class in the format of an opening argument
  2. Unit 2: Innocent Until Proven Guilty
    • Content: Canterbury Tales
    • Witness statement
    • Gathering evidence
    • Creation of Google websites with character analyses
    • Regular blogging as a character
  3. Unit 3: The Art of Argument – Building a Case
    • Content: war protests and speeches
    • Voices of Protest
    • Silent discussion on War
    • Socratic Seminar on women’s rights
    • Today’s Meet backchannel analysis of Edwin Starr’s song War
    • Student analysis of song of their choice
  4. Unit 4: Hearings and Motions – Pretrial Hearings and Motions
    • Content: Hamlet
    • Refining witness statements
    • Witness prep
    • Deconstructing trials in teams
    • Pre-trial hearing
  5. Unit 5: Closing Arguments
    • Content: Beowulf
    • Argument of Good vs. Evil
    • How to make a strong appeal – rhetorical triangle
    • Final product: individual paper
  6. Unit 6: Do We Have a Verdict?
    • Content: Paradise Lost
    • Full trial proceedings including all skills in units 1-5.

Culmination

The next class to experience the trial will have completed each step once in advance and will be compiling and returning to all of the lessons learned throughout the course: opening arguments, creating witness statements, collecting and analyzing evidence, building a defense, interviewing witnesses, creating follow-up questions, making objections, and addressing the judge.  

I’ll be back to share the details of the big trial.

Ms. Heyward and I have already decided for the next iteration we need to transport the students to a real hearing room in the county. We’re not sure we can pull that off, but as my mother always says, “Nothing ventured, nothing gained.”

Just remember you, too, can develop a lesson like this.  

Don’t expect to do it all on the first try.  Give yourself time and room to grow with the activity.  If you take on too much too early you might be more likely to fail or get burned out.  

Good luck, and please share your ideas, comments, successes and failures here with the rest of us.

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Human Touch In Schools

Human Touch In Schools

How do we interact with students?

Recently, I decided it was time to treat myself to regular yoga classes.  I had been too busy with work and family for too many years and realized that I needed to do it to stay happy and healthy.  While participating in the classes, I experienced three different instructors, and the differences opened my eyes to how we interact with students in our classes.

Currently, there is a movement in education to make connections with students called Capturing Kids’ Hearts.  It works off the premise that “students don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care” ~John C. Maxwell.  In capturing kids hearts, step one requires teachers to greet students at the classroom door shaking hands or fist pumping or high-fiving their students.  The point is to make physical contact with each student using appropriate human touch as a physical connection and a way to say, “I see you, and you are important to me.”  If human touch is important, why stop at the door?

What’s yoga got to do with it?

Here’s where yoga comes in.  My three instructors all knew their trade and were pros.Teachers care enough to get close enough to touch you while encouraging you. However, only one made a real contact with me and made me feel important.  I’m sure you can guess which one.  It was the one who got close enough to touch me gently on the shoulder or arm or torso while she encouraged me with, “good” or “nice” or some other word of support.  The other instructors gave verbal support, but honestly, I never really knew if each spoke to me.  However, the instructor who touched me on the shoulder and said, “Nice,” affected me 10 fold.  I knew she was speaking to me, and I knew that I was improving.

Why is human touch important?

The power of human touch.The idea of touching a student has gotten so perverse that teachers are afraid to touch students in any way, shape, or form.  Obviously, this can be detrimental because touch is important in so many cultures.  Surely, there are situations when you would not touch students even on the shoulder or arm as in the case of autistic students or children who might have been abused.  Their reaction to touch might be very detrimental.  However, with this restriction in place, think about the many, many students who do not fit these categories and who would benefit from human touch.

 

According to Rick Chillot in a 2013 posting for Psychology TodayThe Power of Touch,” brief social encounters with appropriate human touch is something that is welcomed and even appreciated:

“More recent studies have found that seemingly insignificant touches yield bigger tips for waitresses, that people shop and buy more if they’re touched by a store greeter, and that strangers are more likely to help someone if a touch accompanies the request. Call it the human touch, a brief reminder that we are, at our core, social animals.”

Think about what you can do in your classroom and building to let people around know, “I see you, and you are important to me.”

Resources:

Chillot, Rick. “The Power of Touch.” Blog post. Psychology Today. Sussex Publishers, LLC, 13 Mar. 2013. Web. 26 Mar. 2017.

Steward, A. Lee, and Michael Lupfer. “Touching as Teaching: The Effect of Touch on Students’ Perceptions and Performance.” Journal of Applied Social Psychology17.9 (1987): 800-09. Chrome Web Browser. Web. 25 Mar. 2017.

 

Authentic Learning – SharkTank Meets UN Grant

Authentic Learning – SharkTank Meets UN Grant

Improving the World One Grant at a Time

Making English class relevant is not always easy.  Knowing how to read, write, and communicate effectively are important life skills; however, this seems to escape teenagers.  English class can be made relevant through authentic learning activities and authentic assessments.  If you are looking for an authentic learning activity including Sharktank, a United Nations grant, a jury, and a solution to social issues, read on.

Project Structure

Mrs. Collier teaches block scheduled English I classes.  This means that she has 3 classes a day for 90 minutes each.  For a unit on the rhetorical triangle, Mrs. Collier decided to challenge her students with a problem-based scenario; her students were challenged to present to a panel from the United Nations offering a $4,000,000 grant to support the most innovative product to solve the social problem caused by fast food.  Think Shark Tank here.  The students were expected to apply their knowledge of the rhetorical triangle and their skills of research, analysis of information, creative problem-solving, and presentation to convince the panel that their team and their product was the most viable and deserving of the $4 million grant.

Student Research

First, students collaborated in groups of three and were tasked to read one chapter in Fast Food Nation dealing with a specific social problem created by fast food.  After reading the chapter, students had to research the social problem and come up with a Shark Tank-like product to solve the problem.  Next, the students had to create a presentation to try to convince the United Nations Grant Committee that their product most deserves the $4 million grant.

fast_food_safety global_business_effects_on_minorities how_fast_food_affects_earth lower_qualitygreater_profit

Persuasion and the Rhetorical Triangle

The students were tasked with applying the Rhetorical Triangle within their presentation to persuade the United Nations Grant Committee to choose their project idea as the most deserving of the $4 million grant.  Having had training in applying logos, ethos, and pathos students were required to utilize all three in their presentations.

United Nations Grant Committee

Authentic Learning Activity: United Nations Panel juries student presentations on solving social issues created by fast food.Then, to make the activity more authentic, Ms. Collier invited
community and district members to judge the presentations over two days.  Along with Lainie Berry, the District Director of Innovation and Digital Learning; and Caroline Mullis, a representative of the 
Coast Community Foundation of SC;  I had the honor and thrill of serving on the UN Grant Committee to judge 4 of the 8 projects.  The 4 products included a citizen watch-dog project to monitor pollution, a government-led pollution-monitoring system, a machine that detects E.coli in fast food burger meat, and a biodegradable and edible food packaging.

Jury Decision

un_panel_discussion

 

The Google Slides visual presentations were of varying quality as were the live student presentations.  Overall, the 3-person jury was impressed with the level of research and creativity presented by each group.  Mrs. Collier provided each jury member a rubric to judge the product, the presentation, and the rhetorical triangle and invited the jury members to ask questions for clarification before making our final decision.  We three jury members discussed the strengths and weaknesses of each group, narrowed it down to two, and finally settled on one group to receive the grant.  The winner was the biodegradable packaging to slow the pollution in the Arctic Circle.

Authentic Jury Feedback

un_panel_addresses_students

Finally, understanding the power of outside influence, Mrs. Collier invitedun_panel_addresses_students3 the 3 jury members to give constructive feedback to the teams.  This particular team was powerful because one member is a former high school English teacher, one deals with budgets and deciding longevity of a project, and the third deals with grant applications daily and knows what to look for.  The feedback given to the students included standard points about body language, confidence, volume, diction, and eye contact.  After that, the jury explained the strengths of each group’s idea.  Finally, the jury explained how important it is to cover all of the research thoroughly, and that knowledge of the subject matter is what ultimately gave us the confidence to grant one group $4 million.

un_panel_addresses_students4

Authentic Learning Take-Aways

This experience raised the level of engagement for the students because they had an authentic audience.  Mrs. Collier did a fantastic job creating a real-world scenario with a real-world issue.  Kudos to her and her students for their hard work and dedication to learning.

If you are interested in creating more authentic experiences for your students, I recommend heading to YouTube for a basic search.  We found plenty of examples that served as an outline for what we wanted to do.

If you have participated in authentic activities with your students, please leave a comment to start a discussion.  I’d love to hear from you about how things went and what we can learn from one another’s experiences.

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